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News & Policy


August 23, 2016

DEMO 2016 - Less Than A Month Away!



Look for us at DEMO! The TLA is a DEMO media sponsor and we'll have a booth at the live equipment show. Find us at booth SB-55, across from the John Deere site. 

UNIQUE "IN-WOODS & IN ACTION" FORESTRY EVENT RETURNING TO THE WEST COAST THIS SEPTEMBER
 
Maple Ridge, BC – With mere weeks to go until the 2016 edition of DEMO International®, preparations are in the final stages and excitement is at an all-time high. Taking place September 22nd to 24th, 2016, this is a unique, world-class event with exhibitors, visitors and media in attendance from around the world, including the United States, South America and Europe.

The flagship event of the Canadian Woodlands Forum, DEMO International® takes place every four years in a different location, and showcases the latest in forestry equipment, from stump to dump, in action and in the forest. It is returning to the west coast for the first time in 16 years, and will be hosted by the Faculty of Forestry at the University of British Columbia in beautiful Maple Ridge, BC.

“We’ve seen an amazing transformation since our last site visit in May,” said Mark Cusack, National Show Manager with Master Promotions Ltd., producer of DEMO International®. “We are just back from another successful site visit and everything looks fantastic. Space is now close to sold out with just three sites remaining. This will definitely be a sold out event!”
The show’s 2016 edition will include 150 exhibitors positioned around a 3.2 kilometre loop of roadway specially built for the show. The SITE PLAN includes a mix of static sites as well as 20 active sites featuring working machinery and live demos.

VISITOR REGISTRATION is available on the show website now. For a limited time, visitors can purchase a one-day pass for $40 or a three-day pass for $60.
The Honourable Steve Thomson, Minister of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations has been appointed DEMO International® 2016 Honourary Chair. As a champion of the forestry sector in British Columbia, his experience and leadership will help showcase BC’s forest industry worldwide.

During the course of its 49-year history, DEMO International® has evolved into one of North America’s largest and most distinctive outdoor equipment shows. This “all live and in action, in-woods” equipment show attracts more than 150 exhibitors featuring the latest technologies in equipment, products and services covering all aspects of woodlands operations. 2016 marks its 13th edition.

For complete details and information, visit WWW.DEMOINTERNATIONAL.COM or FIND THE SHOW ON FACEBOOK.
 
Media Inquiries:
Peter Robichaud
Executive Director
Canadian Woodlands Forum
Phone (902) 897-6961
Cell (902) 899-6420
Email PROBICHAUD@CWFCOF.ORG

 
 

August 09, 2016

Ferns & Fallers Magazine in Powell River

Communtiy Support for Forestry in Powell River Publication
Ferns & Fallers has been published in Powell River annually for the last three years. It's a community-based publication that gives a balanced perspective on forestry on the Sunshine Coast and in BC generally. David Elstone, TLA Executive Director, and Bob Marquis, TLA member, are both quoted in one article, "Are forestry jobs green jobs?" But the whole magazine is worth a read if you have time.
Read Ferns & Fallers online here.


July 13, 2016

Truck LoggerBC - Summer 2016



The summer isssue of Truck LoggerBC is now online! Read it here.

June 20, 2016

Community Perspectives on the BC Coastal Forest Industry


June 20, 2016, Vancouver - Community leaders are not as optimistic as they once were about the coastal forest industry, and most feel the industry is in worse shape now than it was just over a decade ago. Not surprisingly, mayors are concerned about job loss and the economic impact on coastal towns and cities. These are just a few of the findings from an extensive study measuring the pulse  and perspectives of coastal communities undertaken by The Truck Loggers Association, which represents independent timber harvesting contractors working on BC’s coast.  

“Contractors are the economic backbone of many rural communities,” explained TLA Executive Director David Elstone. “Since our last survey, more than 25 timber harvesting contractors have had to seek insolvency protection in communities throughout coastal BC.”

Communities Perspectives on the BC Coastal Forest Industry reports on the outcome of two surveys conducted by the TLA, one in 2004 and the other in 2015, benchmarking changes in attitude and expectation. The 27 community leaders who responded to our survey are quick to acknowledge the importance of forestry to their local economies and some see a recent market recovery in the coastal forest industry bringing hope back to their communities. 

“Campbell River certainly has been adversely impacted…with the loss of the TimberWest sawmill and the Catalyst pulp mill. We see that [industry] starting to come back and we’re certainly welcoming it," commented Andy Adams, Mayor of Campbell River.

Other findings released in the report are:
  • 62% of community leaders show guarded support for log exports today as compared to 60% in the past. 
  • There is even stronger support for the working forest with 86% of community leaders supporting the concept compared to 80% in 2004. 
  • Nearly 30% of the mayors we reached out to think their communities were impacted by the creation of parks and protected areas, some positively, some negatively.
  • There is strong support for First Nations involvement in the coastal forest sector, which has generated new opportunity in business and employment since our last survey. 
  • Community leaders continue to recognize the need to improve the image of the forest industry in order to attract young people to fill the projected 4,700 job openings in the coastal industry between now and 2022.
There is also consensus that more needs to be done. The TLA’s study indicates community leaders are frequently unsure of the province’s efforts to improve forest practices and policies, and even when they are aware they often have difficulty being heard. The TLA is committed to expanding its reach by sharing its unique community perspective with the provincial government to address the concerns expressed by its member companies and these communities.

“More than half of our community leaders are still optimistic about the future of forestry in the face of all the adversity the coastal forest industry has withstood over the past few decades,” pointed out David Elstone, TLA Executive Director. “We stand with them and will work to ensure the working forest and the industry it supports will continue to create jobs for local communities.”

– 30 –
 
For more information: Brenda Martin, Director of Communications, The Truck Loggers Association 
Phone: 604.684.4291 ◦ Cell: 604.339.7554 ◦ Fax: 604.684.7134 ◦ Email: brenda@tla.ca
Twitter: @truckloggerBC ◦ Website: www.tla.ca
 

June 20, 2016

Community Perspectives on the BC Coastal Forest Industry

Linking Communities and Provincial Decision-Makers
 
By acting as a vital link between communities and the province and providing hands-on advice to government, industry and community leaders, the TLA helps to create workable solutions that address the challenges facing today’s forest industry. To this end, the TLA undertook a follow-up study to the one it conducted in 2004 to measure the pulse and perspectives of our coastal communities.
 
As in our previous study, community leaders were surveyed because we wanted to see what impact the massive forest policy changes that took place over the last decade had on the viability of the communities they represent. A total of 27 coastal BC communities responded (three more than in 2004), including many where forestry has the greatest local economic impact.
 
Our 2004 survey was the first ever to gather opinions related to the changing forest industry from leaders in the communities where TLA members live and work. In our follow up, we have collated these unique perspectives into this report, comparing responses with previous ones so we can benchmark how the changing forest industry has affected the sustainability of our sector and our communities.
 
This report is not meant to be exhaustive, but rather identifies forestry related issues of concern to coastal community leaders today. All community leaders contacted were appreciative of the opportunity to exchange views with an organization dedicated to supporting community-based business.
 

Press Release

June 20, 2016, Vancouver - Community leaders are not as optimistic as they once were about the coastal forest industry, and most feel the industry is in worse shape now than it was just over a decade ago. Not surprisingly, mayors are concerned about job loss and the economic impact on coastal towns and cities. These are just a few of the findings from an extensive study measuring the pulse  and perspectives of coastal communities undertaken by The Truck Loggers Association, which represents independent timber harvesting contractors working on BC’s coast.  

“Contractors are the economic backbone of many rural communities,” explained TLA Executive Director David Elstone. “Since our last survey, more than 25 timber harvesting contractors have had to seek insolvency protection in communities throughout coastal BC.”

Communities Perspectives on the BC Coastal Forest Industry reports on the outcome of two surveys conducted by the TLA, one in 2004 and the other in 2015, benchmarking changes in attitude and expectation. The 27 community leaders who responded to our survey are quick to acknowledge the importance of forestry to their local economies and some see a recent market recovery in the coastal forest industry bringing hope back to their communities. 

“Campbell River certainly has been adversely impacted…with the loss of the TimberWest sawmill and the Catalyst pulp mill. We see that [industry] starting to come back and we’re certainly welcoming it," commented Andy Adams, Mayor of Campbell River.

Other findings released in the report are:
  • 62% of community leaders show guarded support for log exports today as compared to 60% in the past. 
  • There is even stronger support for the working forest with 86% of community leaders supporting the concept compared to 80% in 2004. 
  • Nearly 30% of the mayors we reached out to think their communities were impacted by the creation of parks and protected areas, some positively, some negatively.
  • There is strong support for First Nations involvement in the coastal forest sector, which has generated new opportunity in business and employment since our last survey. 
  • Community leaders continue to recognize the need to improve the image of the forest industry in order to attract young people to fill the projected 4,700 job openings in the coastal industry between now and 2022.
There is also consensus that more needs to be done. The TLA’s study indicates community leaders are frequently unsure of the province’s efforts to improve forest practices and policies, and even when they are aware they often have difficulty being heard. The TLA is committed to expanding its reach by sharing its unique community perspective with the provincial government to address the concerns expressed by its member companies and these communities.

“More than half of our community leaders are still optimistic about the future of forestry in the face of all the adversity the coastal forest industry has withstood over the past few decades,” pointed out David Elstone, TLA Executive Director. “We stand with them and will work to ensure the working forest and the industry it supports will continue to create jobs for local communities.”
-30-
 

June 14, 2016

Truck loggers glad to see cutblock auction go ahead

Truck loggers glad to see cutblock auction go ahead
Coast Reporter, June 10, 2016
By Sean Eckford
 
A BC Timber Sales (BCTS) cutblock auction that drew opposition from conservation groups and the Sunshine Coast Regional District (SCRD) closed as scheduled June 3.
 
There’s no word yet on which company has been awarded the logging rights for A87125, on the slopes of Mount Elphinstone, or when harvesting could begin.
 
But a group representing the province’s independent timber harvesters is happy the auction went ahead, and says it’s a better move for the future of the forest.
 
David Elstone, executive director of the Truck Loggers Association (TLA), said having access to BCTS cutblocks is vital for their members, and the local economy.
 
“Resource development generates economic activity that gets fed back into the provincial economy, and our local economy,” he said. “We’re not Whistler, where you have a massive tourism industry that survives year around. I think you need to have resource development of this nature as part of your diversity of your community to allow people to live, and work and play in your community.”