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Equipment Mechanical Services

These jobs involve repairing and servicing the many trucks & heavy equipment operated on forestry, logging and forest road construction projects—either outdoors at the forest jobsite, or indoors at an equipment repair shop.
 
Keeping the machinery working and the trucks moving in the forest demands a skilled team of mechanics and service technicians on the job daily. Every forest management operation jobsite employs a range of mechanized technology, heavy equipment, automated machines, diesel trucks, and small motors. The forest sector “mechanic” is responsible for the prompt and efficient repair of high-tech equipment, as well as preventative service, that keeps machinery producing without needless breakdowns. These mechanics have specialized skills and training tailored to fix and maintain the unique purpose-built modern equipment on the job in the forest. Without these important mechanical technicians, the many wheels-saws-electronic components in the forest production clock grind to an unproductive halt.
 
The forest mechanic works with a wide range of technology—from diesel power, hydraulics, electronics, clutch-brake-transmission, electrical, drive-train tracks & wheels, fuel, sensors & computing, cutting technology, coolant systems, small engine, saws, pumps, and so forth. And when trouble-shooting a malfunction finds an unusual problem, a specialized mechanic may be called-in to help repair the trouble.
 
The mechanic in the forest sector is much more than just a repair-person, because of the ever-changing and continuous innovation in the mechanized technology. The service mechanic must learn new systems and stay current to be able to prevent breakdowns, and readily diagnosis and repair malfunctions. Each mechanic assignment demands specific skills in service and safe repairs. A mechanic may work directly for a logging/forestry company, or they may work for a separate specialized mechanical service company. Other mechanics often work for the equipment or truck dealer, which can service the machinery sold throughout the life of each machine.
 
One of the most unique aspects of the forest mechanic is that the service often must occur at the remote forest jobsite location—where the machine may be parked along a logging road. Much of the service work is done by a “field mechanic,” who drives a fully-equipped service truck to the forest jobsite to complete periodic maintenance and tend to equipment repairs. This adds a whole lot of variety and enjoyable challenge to the mechanic’s job. Of course, there’s always plenty of service and repair that happens inside the shop, under the protection of a roof, and where a complete compliment of tools and diagnostics are available.
 
Because today’s forest management tasks involve so many different modern machines, and continuous improvement in technology, there continues to be a high demand for skilled mechanical technicians in the forest sector. All mechanics in these highly-sought jobs receive ample job-tailored technology training, due to the diverse and demanding service needs. Becoming a proficient mechanic takes a tremendous amount of skill and experience, often learned by working your way up-the-ladder in related jobs and under the apprenticeship of an experienced mechanic. Some mechanics learn their trade by attending mechanical classes at a community college or technical trade school.
 
FIELD SERVICE MECHANIC
Works as a mobile mechanic that drives a fully-equipped service truck to remote forest jobsites, where heavy equipment, large trucks, vehicles, and other forestry equipment can be serviced and repaired “in-the field.” Because the mechanic’s customers are located at forest jobsites, their work is at times done day or night—to quickly complete the service and return the repaired machine to production. The field service mechanic diagnoses, repairs, and maintains heavy equipment and trucks used in the forest; and the mechanic may be aided by a mechanic’s assistant, who helps complete complex repair tasks. Although this mechanic usually drives to remote field locations to complete repairs on equipment at the jobsite, at times they may conduct repairs indoors at a machinery repair facility, or “shop.” Drives a fully-contained service truck stocked with tools, diagnostic instruments and parts. Mechanic often works alone, but may collaborate with other mechanics and specialized mechanical technicians, to complete repair projects. Mechanic combines their expertise with written service manuals and the latest technology, to quickly do many duties: arrive at the machine/truck or tow machine to shop; trouble-shoot problems with the operator/driver; diagnose solutions; procure needed parts; and conduct needed repairs. Travel to forest jobsites in a shop truck is on both highways and on unpaved, narrow, winding, steep forest roads. Mechanic works to safely route-find and drive to jobsite. Mechanic communicates safe travel on single-lane logging roads using citizens band (CB) radios. Requires special safety clothing, climbing off & onto trucks, and some walking on sloping forest terrain.
 
Prior Experience: Work as a shop mechanic and mechanic’s assistant; Drivers License; completed coursework in current mechanical technology applicable to forest machinery/trucks; preferred study in mechanical technology at high school, trade school or community college; preferred previous experience operating or servicing trucks, forestry or farm equipment; learn from work with experienced mechanic; demonstrated safe mechanic performance; written mechanic handbooks and service guides; on-the-job-training.
 
MECHANIC'S ASSISTANT
Works as a helper to assist experienced mechanics complete service and repair of heavy equipment, large trucks, vehicles, and other forestry equipment. Mechanic’s assistant often works indoors at a machinery/truck repair facility, or “shop.” However, assistant could also work indoors at a “saw shop” that repairs small equipment, or even as a helper for a mobile field service mechanic, who drives a fully-equipped service truck to remote forest jobsites to complete repairs.
 
The shop mechanic diagnoses, repairs, and maintains heavy equipment and trucks used in the forest; and the mechanic may be aided by a mechanic’s assistant, who helps complete complex repair tasks. Although this mechanic does much of their work in the shop, the mechanic may also at times drive to remote field locations to complete repairs on equipment at the jobsite. Mechanic may work alone, but often collaborates with other mechanics, specialized mechanical technicians or assistants, to complete repair projects. Mechanic combines their expertise with written service manuals and the latest technology, to quickly do many duties: arrive at the machine/truck or tow machine to shop; trouble-shoot problems with the operator/driver; diagnose solutions; procure needed parts; and conduct needed repairs. Any travel to forest jobsites in a shop truck is on both highways and on unpaved, narrow, winding, steep forest roads. Mechanic works to safely route-find and drive to jobsite. Mechanic communicates safe travel on single-lane logging roads using citizens band (CB) radios. Requires special safety clothing, climbing off & onto trucks, and some walking on sloping forest terrain.
 
Prior Experience: Work as a mechanic’s assistant; Drivers License; preferred study in mechanical technology at high school,trade school or community college; preferred previous experience operating or servicing trucks, forestry or farm equipment; learn from work with experienced mechanic; demonstrated safe mechanic performance; written mechanic handbooks and service guides; on-the-job-training.
 
SAW SHOP / SMALL MOTOR MECHANIC
Works indoors at a repair facility that repairs small equipment, a “saw shop” or logging supply store, where chainsaws, cutting chain, fire pumps, small motors, forest tools, logging rigging, and other forestry gear is serviced. The saw shop mechanic diagnoses, repairs, and maintains small equipment used in the forest; and the mechanic may be aided by a mechanic’s assistant, who helps complete complex repair tasks. Mechanic may work alone, but often collaborates with other mechanics, specialized mechanical technicians or assistants, to complete repair projects. Mechanic combines their expertise with written service manuals and the latest technology, to quickly do many duties: trouble-shoot problems with the operator; diagnose solutions; procure needed parts; and conduct needed repairs.
 
Prior Experience:
 
Work as a mechanic's assistant; preferred study in mechanical technology at high school, trade school or community college; preferred previous experience operating or servicing forestry or farm equipment; learn from work with experienced mechanic; demonstrated safe mechanic performance; written mechanic handbooks and service guides; on-the-job-training.
 
SHOP MECHANIC
Works indoors at a machinery repair facility, or “shop,” where heavy equipment, large trucks, vehicles, and other forestry equipment is serviced and repaired. The shop mechanic diagnoses, repairs, and maintains heavy equipment and trucks used in the forest; and the mechanic may be aided by a mechanic’s assistant, who helps complete complex repair tasks. Although this mechanic does much of their work in the shop, the mechanic may also at times drive to remote field locations to complete repairs on equipment at the jobsite. Mechanic may work alone, but often collaborates with other mechanics, specialized mechanical technicians or assistants, to complete repair projects. Mechanic combines their expertise with written service manuals and the latest technology, to quickly do many duties: arrive at the machine/truck or tow machine to shop; trouble-shoot problems with the operator/driver; diagnose solutions; procure needed parts; and conduct needed repairs. Any travel to forest jobsites in a shop truck is on both highways and on unpaved, narrow, winding, steep forest roads. Mechanic works to safely route-find and drive to jobsite. Mechanic communicates safe travel on single-lane logging roads using citizens band (CB) radios. Requires special safety clothing, climbing off & onto trucks, and some walking on sloping forest terrain.
 
Prior Experience: Work as a mechanic’s assistant; Drivers License; preferred study in mechanical technology at high school, trade school or community college; preferred previous experience operating or servicing trucks, forestry or farm equipment; learn from work with experienced mechanic; demonstrated safe mechanic performance; written mechanic handbooks and service guides; on-the-job-training.
 
SPECIALIZED MECHANIC
A “specialized mechanic” is qualified—through both experience & education—in a particular mechanical trade, intended to service a narrow aspect of today’s complex forest technology. Specialized mechanical trades may include:
 
  • Truck Mechanic
  • Heavy Equipment Mech.
  • Electronic Mechanic
  • Hydraulic Mechanic Diesel Mechanic
  • Helicopter Mechanic
The specialized mechanic diagnoses, repairs, and maintains heavy equipment and trucks used in the forest; and the mechanic may be aided by a mechanic’s assistant, who helps complete complex repair tasks. Although this mechanic does much of their work indoors at a machinery repair facility, or “shop,” the mechanic may also at times drive to remote field locations to complete repairs on equipment at the jobsite. Mechanic may work alone, but often collaborates with other mechanics to complete repair projects.
 
Mechanic combines their expertise with written service manuals and the latest technology, to quickly do many duties: arrive at the machine/truck; trouble-shoot problems with the operator/driver; diagnose solutions; procure needed parts; and conduct needed repairs. Any travel to forest jobsites in a shop truck is on both highways and on unpaved, narrow, winding, steep forest roads.
 
Mechanic works to safely route-find and drive to jobsite. Mechanic communicates safe travel on single-lane logging roads using citizens band (CB) radios. Requires special safety clothing, climbing off & onto trucks, and some walking on sloping forest terrain.
 
Prior Experience:
  • Work as a shop mechanic
  • Drivers License
  • Completed specialized mechanical trade
  • Coursework applicable to forest machinery/trucks
  • Preferred study in mechanical technology at high school, trade school or community college
  • Preferred previous experience operating or servicing trucks, forestry or farm equipment
  • Learn from work with experienced mechanic
  • Demonstrated safe mechanic performance
  • Written mechanic handbooks and service guides
  • On-the-job-training.